In past projects, students have had the opportunity to

Legal Secretary, National Labor Relations Board

Communication Studies Bachelor's Degree

These University of California videotapes areproduced by Dane Archer, a Professor at theUniversity of California at Santa Cruz (Email:).GETTING STARTED: To learn more about nonverbalcommunication, including a chance to test yourability to read real samples, click on any of thefollowing titles.

Psychology Bachelor's DegreeSpanish for Business and the Professions Undergraduate Certificate

Type: Academic clubAvailable To: Undergraduate and Graduate

(For students not majoring in a science.) Prerequisite: MATH 012 or higher. An introduction to the basic principles of physics and chemistry, with applications to geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. The objective is to use scientific and quantitative reasoning to make informed decisions about topics related to physical science. Discussion covers the development of scientific thinking, the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences, the role of the physical sciences in interpreting the natural world, and the integrated use of technology. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GNSC 100, NSCI 100, or NSCI 103.

Hear how alum Kirk Clear fast-tracked his degree before retiring from the military.

Prerequisites: COMM 300 and either WRTG 391, WRTG 393, or WRTG 394. A project-based capstone study of communication. The aim is to integrate knowledge gained through previous coursework and experience and build on that conceptual foundation through integrative analysis, practical application, and critical thinking. Tasks include assembling and analyzing a portfolio and completing a final project (such as a research based report and presentation, feasibility study, feature article, or career strategic plan) that requires conducting research and exploring ethical issues.

Hear how alum Kirk Clear fast-tracked his degree before retiring from the military.


What do contemporary police procedures tell us about criminality?

You can even testyour own ability to "read" samples of realnonverbal communication.Research shows that clues in the nonverbal"channels" of communication (how something is said)are often more important than words alone (what issaid).There are many different "channels" ofnonverbal communication: facial expressions, theclues in our voices ("vocal paralanguage"), handgestures, body movements ("kinesics"), touch ("haptics"), and personal space.

University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Mediators may be especially interested in some of these topics. For instance, when parties hold grudges towards each other, increasing eye contact between them may polarize them further. But once individuals permit more humanity in each other, increased eye contact may act to increase positive feelings among the parties (Billikopf, 2009). Similar comments may apply to proxemics (Knapp & Hall, 2010).

This program accepts up to 90 transfer credits.

(Fulfills the general education requirement in communications but is not a writing course.) Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. An introduction to communication theory. The objective is to apply communication theory and evaluate communication situations. The basic theories of human communication, mass communication, and new media and technology are explored. Focus is on the relationships among communication theory, research, and practice. Topics include intra- and interpersonal communication, public communication, mass media, and contemporary issues associated with mediated communication.

Plus, more than 100 , , and an are available for those who qualify.

(No previous study of law required. Fulfills the general education requirement in communications but is not a writing course.) Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. Recommended: WRTG 391, WRTG 393, or WRTG 394. An examination of important legal issues that affect mass media and communications professionals. The objective is to analyze mass media law, its evolution, and its relationship with society, culture, and politics. Topics include copyright, intellectual property, fair use, defamation, privacy, freedom of information, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press, as well as issues raised by the growth of the Internet. Discussion also covers ethics in mass media, digital technologies, and the creation of media content. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: COMM 400 or JOUR 400.

UMUC is a proud member of the University System of Maryland.

A study of the creation and interpretation of visual language. The aim is to understand how images are used to effectively communicate ideas in a variety of channels, including news, advertising, and public relations. Topics include aesthetics, principles of composition, color systems, content awareness, and historical and cultural perspectives. Emphasis is on critical thinking and analysis of images from both theoretical and practical perspectives.