Write something that sounds like you and it will stand up for itself.

Now that you know a little more about Sudoku, play and enjoy this free online game.

Congratulations on a great article!

You could describe the geography and history of the area, share interesting snippets about the people and donkeys you interacted with, and discuss your exploration of life-and-death questions as you progressed along your arduous journey.

To offer your thoughts on what Ms. Gerszberg has written, please use . To read more by her, .

Have you written or are you planning to write a memoir?

I know there is a memoir within me, but I didn’t know how or where to start. Your article has certainly ignited some ideas in my mind….thank you, Shannon! #HUGS

Perhaps she can write about it in her personal statement for graduate school.

Hey Wendy, I hear ya. I had to go to my parent’s cabin to finish my book–where I could scream and cry and yell and hit the pillow (all of these did happen!) when I needed to relive the hard parts. But to get all that off my chest and into something I am now proud of is key! 🙂


Neil, sounds like you did and are excited about it!

Thanks for the helpful article. I’m wondering how much of your advice I can apply to my current project. I have been hired to write the story of a 95 year-old woman. I’ve been interviewing her once or twice a week for several months. Her children approached me to do this, but she is excited about it and looking forward to seeing the book. I guess it will be more of a biography than a memoir, but I want to include stories written as scenes, with details to keep it interesting.

You are very generous, thank you. I WILL!

Hi Carolyn! I think you have the “write” idea to think of each chapter as a scene and lead your readers through those scenes as they progress through the book. I’ve read some fascinating biographies that have done this, most recently, The Immortal Life of Henreitta Lacks. Have you read this book? You might want to snag a copy and study the organization!

Hey Marlene! Wishing you the best of luck!

Hey Faith. Yes, go for the sliver method. I started working with a memoir writer today and once we narrowed the focus to overarching theme, it was much easier to find the slivers that fit that theme. Good luck! Can’t wait to see what you come up with!

Pimion – that is great news. You can do it, I am sure!

Thank you Shannon for your sage advice. I’ve been working on my memoirs in essay form for about 10 years now with the help of my writer’s group. I appreciate what you say about creating a story with arc and viewing the people in the memoir as characters. In addition, I’m grateful for the recommendation of picking one time period (“a sliver of pie”) rather than doing a chronology of everything. Now I realize that I have 3 distinct events that happened in my life to shape me and I look forward to gearing my memoirs towards that goal. Your advice opened my eyes to the possibilities…

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Shannon thank you for this brilliant post and extremely excellent timing! I had a small crisis of confidence this week and I’m so happy to read that travel memoir/narrative is still a valid and loved genre. I am less than a month away from hitting the “publish” button for “Postcards from France”. MERCI